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run, don't walk, do not pass go, do not collect $200 and read this book! - Princess
maigrey
maigrey
run, don't walk, do not pass go, do not collect $200 and read this book!
On my dad's recommendation, I checked out The Wisdom of Crowds by James Surowiecki from the Library and it's an incredibly fascinating read, and makes me think of all the ways I could foster more workplace sharing. It's good enough that I bought it because I want to have my own copy of it.

If you were a fan of Blink- The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, The Tipping Point- How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, or Freakonomics, you will like this book.

From Publishers Weekly
While our culture generally trusts experts and distrusts the wisdom of the masses, New Yorker business columnist Surowiecki argues that "under the right circumstances, groups are remarkably intelligent, and are often smarter than the smartest people in them." To support this almost counterintuitive proposition, Surowiecki explores problems involving cognition (we're all trying to identify a correct answer), coordination (we need to synchronize our individual activities with others) and cooperation (we have to act together despite our self-interest). His rubric, then, covers a range of problems, including driving in traffic, competing on TV game shows, maximizing stock market performance, voting for political candidates, navigating busy sidewalks, tracking SARS and designing Internet search engines like Google. If four basic conditions are met, a crowd's "collective intelligence" will produce better outcomes than a small group of experts, Surowiecki says, even if members of the crowd don't know all the facts or choose, individually, to act irrationally. "Wise crowds" need (1) diversity of opinion; (2) independence of members from one another; (3) decentralization; and (4) a good method for aggregating opinions. The diversity brings in different information; independence keeps people from being swayed by a single opinion leader; people's errors balance each other out; and including all opinions guarantees that the results are "smarter" than if a single expert had been in charge. Surowiecki's style is pleasantly informal, a tactical disguise for what might otherwise be rather dense material. He offers a great introduction to applied behavioral economics and game theory.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Also on my reading list: Wikinomics- How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything and The 4-Hour Workweek- Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich
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